Growing Horseradish

(from 20 Everyday Herbs – see below)

Horseradish is a prolific plant and should be positioned carefully in the garden. It will tolerate partial shade but prefers a sunny spot if possible. Choose a permanent place as horseradish will last many years.

Dig the ground deep and clear out any weeds, large stones and non-organic debris. The cleaner the soil, the bigger the roots will grow. More preparation will guarantee better crops.

The horseradish root likes a rich well-manured soil and not too heavy. All root crops struggle in heavy soils.

To inhibit rapid spreading, containers work well as they literally contain the plant.
Fill containers with organic compost and position in a sunny spot. Make sure the container is well-drained, and kept watered and weed-free.


Not easy to find horse radish roots for sale online although Ebay might be worth a shot. Not even Amazon seemed to have any when I looked. They sell a lot of wasabi which is a close relative but I’m not sure if there are any different growing requirements.

Vsorce4u 100 x Wasabi Viable Bonsai Seeds

Package Included: 100 x Wasabi Seeds
Wasabi has numerous health benefits and a distinctive fresh, hot, sweet flavor that can’t be matched. This is the true wasabi.

These cold-stored seeds must be planted in potting soil. Germination of this summer or fall planted seed is in the very early spring. By March the seedlings will have formed 2 sets of true leaves and its time to pot them up.

Wasabi Seeds Here (UK)

Horseradish is usually grown from root cuttings which you can buy from good garden suppliers. Plant the root in early spring or autumn. Check on the supplier’s growing recommendations, as size of root, variety and regions will have varying needs.

A neighbour or local gardener may be happy to donate a root or two to start you off. Plant as soon as possible after the roots have been lifted from the soil.

Plant the roots according to how big they are. The smaller the root the shallower it should be planted.

Try taking your own root cuttings in the autumn. Dig the roots up gently and use the largest one in the kitchen, then re-plant one or more of the side shoots.

Also, sections of root can be planted in the spring to produce new roots in the autumn. Horseradish does spread quickly though and care should be taken not to let it take over the whole garden. For container growing, choose a large well-drained container and fill with fresh compost before planting.

From seed:

Horseradish can be grown from seed sown in spring. The seeds should be sown in a sunny patch and the ground must be cleaned of large stones and perennial weeds, and dug deeply before sowing to allow for root growth.

Again, the cleaner and richer the soil, the better chance you have of harvesting a good crop.

Thin out the plants when they are a couple of inches (5cm) high to allow space to grow. Keep weed-free and watered especially during dry periods.

Alternatively, sow seed in a large well-drained container. Always use fresh compost when planting containers. Old compost may have been drained of nutrients from previous plantings.

Once established, and with very little attention, the bed will become a permanent horseradish patch and will produce healthy roots for many years.

Dig up all the roots every autumn. Use the largest roots in the kitchen and re-plant the others. This method of cultivation keeps your horseradish patch producing roots regularly and also helps to control the rapid growth.

The young leaves can be used in salads and sandwiches. Take a few from each plant and allow to grow again before using more. The root is cleaned, grated and eaten raw, often mixed with vinegar and cream and served with a Sunday roast.

Horseradish root is said to be stronger tasting after the first frost, so if you can leave them in until then, you will get a better result.

Happy Gardening!

Linda x

P.S. This text is an extract from 20 Everyday Herbs

20 Everyday Herbs

A potted history of twenty everyday herbs, step by step growing instructions, storing ideas and even medicinal uses.

Basil … Bay … Celery … Chives … Coriander … Dill … Fennel … Garlic … Horseradish … Lavender … Lemon Balm … Lovage … Marigold … Mint … Nasturtium … Oregano … Parsley … Rosemary … Sage … Thyme.

’20 Everyday Herbs’ is packed full of everything you need to know about how to grow herbs for everyday use. A must-have!

Choose from your favourite online book store

Amazon (US) , Amazon (UK) , Apple Books , Kobo , Payhip , Etsy , Barnes & Noble

5 Ways to Save the Planet

Make a difference from the comfort of your own home

There are many of us across the world that would love to do more to help our planet survive but are scuppered by lack of time, energy and often money.

This article shows how it can be simple, fun and inexpensive to dissolve those guilty feelings and enjoy harmony with the environment rather than it being a constant cause for concern.

Here are Five Fabulous ways to do your bit for the planet

As little as 20 years ago, recycled or organic goods and products weren’t mainstream and often cost at least 3 times as much as non-organic, making it harder to do your bit for the environment especially if you were bringing up a family.

There’s been a huge increase in availability as the green campaigns for a healthier planet grow stronger. And there are lots of tweaks we can make in our lifestyles to help even more.

Recycling

Many areas have recycling posts or specific containers for individual households. This may seem like an extra chore at home, but habits only need tweaking to make it work. Make sure everyone in the household, apart from maybe the tiniest tots, knows where each item should go; plastics and glass, paper and food etc;

Find a permanent spot for the recycling containers to make it even easier. If you have to go looking for the compost bin, chances are those food scraps will end up in the regular rubbish.

If you have a garden, create a compost heap for the vegetable peelings. A year later you’ll have beautiful compost to dig into the garden or fill plant pots with.

Check over any packaging before you throw it away. Maybe it could be added to the craft box or perhaps be useful in the potting shed. Clear plastic bottles make excellent mini-cloches for delicate plants. Cut in half and you have two cloches for free! And yoghurt pots are perfect for seedlings with a hole punched in the bottom for drainage.

If you’re planning to make jams or preserves later in the year, wash and dry empty jars and lids and store them somewhere safe.

Health begins at home

Gardening is one of the fastest growing ‘hobbies’ which means a whole lot more of us are eating fresh organic produce picked from our own garden, balcony or even window box. There are many plants you can grow in pots; you don’t even need a garden to benefit from a few organic veggies or a daily serving of your favourite herbs.

Herbs not only flavour your food, most of them have medicinal properties as well. A daily glass of tea made from thyme and honey for example will help prevent colds. With a healthy diet and a few natural remedies, you can avoid spending huge sums on potions and medications from the pharmacy.

As well as natural health remedies, try a few natural ‘quality time’ cures as well. Set aside 15 or 20 minutes here and there to play a game with the children – not a computer game. Play games you used to play and enjoy a nostalgic moment while passing on fun ideas to the next generation… aaah wonderful!

Games can be incredibly simple and so much fun; playing ball with tiny tots helps them develop hand eye co-ordination, pencil and paper games are a brilliant way of teaching children new words etc; and simply having a good old fashioned game of Monopoly could be just what the doctor ordered!

Spend more, save more

Commercially there is more competition nowadays for organic produce, which in turn has helped push the price down for the average consumer. Hopefully the organic producers will benefit from larger numbers of consumers to off-set the lower prices.

Sometimes just a few extra pennies can buy the organic alternative – scan the prices before buying because it’s so easy to assume the organic product will be too expensive, when it may not be. Spending a few extra moments checking prices and food labels is time well spent. Write a list before you go shopping and (try to) stick to it.

Buying two bags of 24 packets of crisps because they are on a ‘buy one get one free’ promotion is dodgy because if there are 48 packets of crisps in the larder, they probably won’t last as long as 2 lots of 24 packs! The only way round this is to have a really good hiding place or avoid the BOGOF promos!

When you shop in a supermarket, you are open to all the marketing skills of big corporations and it’s very easy to be led into the aisles of ‘not-so-healthy’ foods, especially if you have children with you.

But if you know you’ve just spent a little more than usual on some organic tomatoes, you’re less likely to be persuaded to part with any more cash than necessary. Shopping in this way can lead to a healthier fridge and wallet! (And it may be a good idea to leave the kids at home.)

Avoiding Land-Fill

With information and practical videos at our fingertips, we can learn traditional skills, some of which have got lost somewhere over the last few generations and get creative in our gift ideas, avoiding buying plastic ‘land-fill’ stuff at least some of the time.

Home-made gifts are always special and you can make them planet-friendly too! Try home-made jams and dried tomatoes for ‘foodies’ or knit something personal like a toy for a child or a delicate shawl for a fashion conscious friend.

Although it pains me slightly to say that you could start planning Christmas presents a year in advance, it’s not as bad as it sounds. Once you have a few ideas for gifts you can make, they can be separate projects you can dip in and out of throughout the year. Long winter evenings or rainy Sunday afternoons are great times to open your ‘Christmas’ project box and dabble a little in something creative.

If you’re planning on giving home-made jams etc; you may want to grow your own strawberries. Strictly speaking, it will take a whole season to start off your gift, but a little pottering in the garden always gives you a boost of energy and well-being.

Do It Yourself

With tons of scientific evidence proving the ingredients in many processed foods aren’t necessarily good for humans, we are all looking towards a less chemically dependent diet. Cooking programmes on TV channels get huge viewing audiences. Indulge in creating meals to really enjoy sometimes rather than throwing any old fast food on a plate because everyone’s ‘starving’ hungry.

The media have been promoting sterile bleached homes for many years and, although we are wising up to the fact that a sterile environment isn’t necessarily good for our immune systems, the habits are hard to break.

Try to avoid products containing bleach. In most cases it really isn’t necessary and causes untold harm to the environment. Next time you enjoy a G&T, don’t throw the slice of lemon away, wipe it round the sink after washing up and the lemon juice will remove many stains. And it leaves a lovely lemony smell in the kitchen.

*Brush up on traditional skills and create soft furnishings such as throws, cushions, bedspreads etc; Build furniture to fit any space or take a pottery class and create beautiful eye-catching sculptures. Make your home a place of beauty, health and harmony … oh, and environment friendly too of course.

Linda x

Necessity, the Mother of Invention

Many years ago, during a period in my life living off the land, money was scarce and children were many!

Coming from London and a townie through and through, even growing food was an alien pastime for me but we had to learn to survive.

The creative ideas that we came up with every day were based almost entirely on necessity but they worked for us at the time. 🙂

I saw a recent social media post – possibly facebook – stating that the only things that really matter in life are:

how to purify water
how to grow food
how to cook
how to build
and how to love

None of these ‘subjects’ are taught in main stream schools – there may be an exception here and there but basically we are all brought up to rely on a system that is purely financially orientated and pays little attention to the things that really matter, that are in fact a necessity.

Recent world events have shaken up the global population and we all have our own opinions and instincts about

what we are being told by mainstream media
what we are finding through underground sources

but many of us are confused and perhaps just going along with whoever ‘sounds’ like they might be telling the truth. And although I could probably rant on all day about corruption, politicians and the big pharmaceutical companies, nothing is going to change from the top.

It’s us individuals who need to take control, or as much control as possible, for our own lives to help not only the human species but all other life forms.

Food was ‘real’ food just a couple of generations ago. Speaking as a grandmother, I can attest to that. I’m not bleating on about the good old days because they weren’t all good, just as everything nowadays isn’t all bad.

Two of the biggest problems we have is that it isn’t always easy or affordable to go ‘plastic-free’ or ‘organic’ and then the guilt sets in or we just think “aw what the hell”. Neither state of mind is particularly good for our overall wellbeing.

The answer? Baby Steps. We are billions in number and if we all took a couple of baby steps whenever possible, we could make a difference.

So getting back to necessity being the mother of invention:

Yes, it is necessary to start protecting our world
Yes, it is necessary to start protecting ourselves – not only from obvious dangers but generally for our mind, body and soul.
And yes, it is necessary to take control of our lives, even a little at a time will help us and future generations of all sentient beings on earth.

Research a few ideas; how to grow food, how to purify water, how to cook efficiently, how to build and how to love yourself more 🙂

Get that inventive beautiful brain working!

With today’s technology, whatever your views on the privacy and plastic issues are, you can find many solutions as like minded folk share their ideas with the world. There are more than 200 posts just on this website alone that relate to home, family, garden and wellbeing issues.

If you have ideas to share, I’d love to hear from you.

To our Healthy Future

Linda x

P.S. This looks like a handy book to have around. I found it on Amazon (UK)

Natural Home Cleaning

Over 100 ways to clean your home naturally

“In this book, you will find over 110 recipes for practically any cleaning dilemma, from natural disinfectant to safe and effective stain removal. The chapters cover every room in your home with simple recipes to make your house sparkly clean.”

Natural Home Cleaning